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Rainy River Valley Safety Coalition is one of eighteen Canadian Safe Communities to report a perfect 20/20 Attribute Score.


District perfect again on safety report card

“Safe community” continues to be apt moniker for the district
after the Safe Communities Rainy River District (SCRRD) scored a perfect
20 out of 20 for the fifth-straight time on the National Report Card
from Safe Communities Canada.
“It truly speaks for the hard work and dedication of the group,” said
SCRRD administrative co-ordinator Grace Silander, who currently is
attending the Safe Communities Canada conference in Vancouver, B.C. and
also will be attending the Canadian Injury Prevention and Safety
Promotion conference there tomorrow and Friday.

“We managed to score 100 percent in both the attributes for Canada Safe
Communities, as well as meeting all the WHO International criteria for
certification standards,” she added.
Rainy River District scored a five out of five in all four categories on the report card.
These scores were above the national averages of 4.6, 3.6, 3.8, and 3.8
in leadership, priority setting, sustainability, and community
engagement, respectively.
The district also scored above average for organizations within the Ontario region.
The average scores for these were 4.5, 3.1, 3.9, and 3.8 in leadership,
priority setting, sustainability, and community engagement,
respectively.
As well, Rainy River District scored five out of five in all six
categories on a companion report card which measures indicators of
international safe communities, as opposed to national ones.
These categories include infrastructure, program sustainability,
priority population, data programs, evaluation, and networking.
These scores were well above the national averages of 3.5, 3.5., 3.3, 2.9, 3.5, and 3.5, respectively.
The perfect scores also put the district well above organizations
within the Ontario region that were evaluated using the same
international indicators.
The average scores for Ontario organizations were 3.4, 3.2, 2.9, 2.6,
3.4, and 3.3 in infrastructure, program sustainability, priority
population, data programs, evaluation, and networking, respectively.
Safe Communities Rainy River District is one of 10 Canadian Safe Communities to report a 20/20 attribute score.
The report card also noted some of its community strengths include:
•championing 20 of the 25 injury prevention and safety promotion programs that ran in its community in the past year;
•completing an evaluation of its effectiveness “as an agent of change” in its community during the past year;
•undertaking a range of strategic initiatives to demonstrate its
leadership in the field of injury prevention and safety promotion in
Rainy River District;
•conducting a community-based priority-setting exercise using data from credible sources during the past year;
•using Safe Communities Canada’s Community-Based Injury Prevention
Priority Setting exercise to set its community’s injury priorities,
assuring the priorities have been set transparently, and are visible and
credible;
•having 180 volunteers contribute 1,700 hours to its activities in the
past year, and effectively using volunteers “to assist with
administrative requirement, [demonstrating] a pragmatic approach to
addressing organizational and administrative capacity”;
•having offered orientation, training, and recognition programs for volunteers as support services;
•having 1,200 citizens in the community participating in injury
prevention and safety promotion programs it has developed or championed
last year (this is an increase from the 250 citizens reported in 2010);
and
•securing funding from a variety of courses, expanding its reach and
influence in the community, and protecting itself from the consequences
of reductions in single-source financial support.
Youth safety
In related news, local paramedic John Beaton and student Jerry Wu are
attending the Canadian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion conference
in Vancouver to make a presentation tomorrow entitled, “The Ripple
Effect: Community Mobilization and Youth Empowerment in a Small Town
Setting.”
The presentation will show how programs such as the Party Alcohol
Related Trauma in Youth (P.A.R.T.Y.), simulated driving experience with
“Fatal Vision” tools program, and high school student medical first
responder program have been initiated and linked together.
It also will show how these programs empower youth into using injury
prevention as an everyday tool in decision-making, as well as show
communities what is needed to make these programs work and some of the
pitfalls to avoid.
Beaton and Wu will use videos and photos to show what has been done in
Rainy River District, and will premiere for the first time nationally
the mock collision produced here back in October, 2008.

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