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Safe Community Designations

MUNICIPAL PRESENTATIONS
Date  
December 6, 2006 La Vallee/Devlin Council
December 11, 2006 Fort Frances Council 6:30 p.m.
Fort Frances Town 10:00 a.m.
December 13, 2006 Rainy River 10:00 a.m. (Rainy River Record)
December 13, 2006 Morley Township 10:45 a.m.
December 13, 2006 Chapple 11:20 a.m.
December 13, 2006 Emo 1:55 a.m.
December 13, 2006 Meet Dawn Hayes Alberton re. resolution wording.
Called January 4 and Council meeting not until next week.
January 27, 2007 Alberton--Rainy River District Municipal Association Meeting Emo.
February 12, 2007

Atikokan--Council in Atikokan.

 

2007 Safe Community Awards2007 Safe Communities Conference
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Rainy River Valley Safety Association Receives
2007 Safe Communities Canada Award of Excellence

Toronto, 11 November 2007 - At a ceremony during the Canadian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, Paul Kells, Safe Communities Canada President and Founder, presented the 2007 Safe Communities Canada Award of Excellence for Community Leadership to the Rainy River Valley Safety Association. Accepting the award was Association Chair Grace Silander.

The Safe Communities Canada Award of Excellence for Community Leadership recognizes outstanding examples of how real community leadership can and does make a difference in our network of designated communities. Safe Community Leadership Tables in a Safe Community is the group of community leaders who set the priorities for its injury prevention and safety promotion programs and engage the community in its injury prevention and safety promotion priorities.

“The cooperative approach of the Rainy River Valley Safety Association’s Leadership Table in establishing program and service delivery priorities is an excellent framework for all of us in the safety reduction field to emulate” Paul Kells said in presenting the award. “Over the course of the last year, wide-ranging innovative initiatives that focused on rail safety, car sea compliance, substance abuse and senior safety were successfully executed” Kells added.

Ms Silander was honoured to receive the award on behalf of the [XX] volunteers associated with the Rainy River Valley Safety Association. “Since being designated a safe community by Safe Communities Canada in 1997, and then designated a World Health Organization Safe Community in 2002, we have worked incredibly hard within our community to reduce the risk of avoidable injuries and deaths with the tremendous support of [funders/community groups] and are very proud of our accomplishments” Silander said.

“Our most recent initiative began as a colouring contest for children focused on rail safety. Quickly it grew into a poster campaign utilizing the winning images and then became placemats used in local diners across the District. Without the support of local businesses there is no way we could have reached the number of people we did with a message that could save their lives. I am very proud of what we have done over the last ten years and we are looking forward to another safe and successful decade ahead”.

Safe Communities Canada is a national charitable organization dedicated to helping communities build the capacity and resources they will need as they commit to coordinated, thoughtful and strategic programmes to reduce the pain of injury and death and promote a culture of safety in every community in the country.

La ValleeSafe Community

Signs to tout town as ‘safe community’

By Duane Hicks
Motorists entering Fort Frances will be sure to know the town is a “safe community” in the future after representatives from the Rainy River Valley Safety Coalition presented new signs declaring such to council Monday night.
RRVSC chair Grace Silander said the seeds of the “safe community” designation were sown back in the 1990s, when several district individuals and groups partnered under the banner of the RRVSC to promote safety programs and healthy lifestyles.
Some of the programs they oversaw included the seniors’ safety checklist, bike helmet promotion, D.A.R.E., “Risk Watch,” child car seat clinics, and the Substance Abuse Prevention team.
By 1999, the RRVSC had brought the district to a point where it was designated a Canadian “safe community.”
“But we wanted to go one more step and tout to the world what a great community we have,” noted Silander.
Seeking accreditation by international standards, the RRVSC continued to promote its message and programs, and in 2002 the district was designated a “safe community” by the World Health Organization during its conference held in Fort Frances.
“The designation is a truly an example of municipalities pulling together for a the betterment of the entire district,” said Silander.
“It was volunteerism at its greatest,” she added. “It showed a caring attitude to the citizens and a huge move towards to their healthy lifestyles.
“Safe movements that we’re working on today continue to modify the behaviours within the communities and with the young,” Silander continued. “It isn’t going to be long before safety is going to be a way of life.”
Last year, the RRVSC asked district municipalities to put up tab signs, stating they were “safe communities,” and so far seven have agreed to do so.
But it was only recently the RRVSC received a letter from the Ministry of Transportation approving the erection of the signs.
It was with this approval the RRVSC is now presenting the signs to the participating district municipalities.
“The new concept for [the] ‘safe community’ foundation is now sharing your successes,” Silander noted. “So we’re now ready to share our success with everyone who travels through the district.”
RRVSC co-ordinator Hugh Dennis encouraged the town to use the signs as part of a marketing strategy to attract individuals and businesses to settle here, adding the “safe community” designation is valuable in this regard.
He noted last spring he was told a story of how a private school elsewhere in Ontario was shaken by a sexual assault and sought to relocate somewhere safer.
School officials decided to move to a new community with a “safe community” status.
“Believe me, I know from my past experience we stand next to nobody as being the safest district in the province,” remarked Dennis, the former OPP detachment commander here.
Mayor Roy Avis noted the new signs will be posted at the east and west entrances to town.
Also at Monday night night’s meeting, council:
•received a strategic plan from Joyce Cunningham, chairwoman of the Fort Frances Public Library board;
•agreed to a request from the Alzheimer Society of Kenora/Rainy River Districts to proclaim January as “National Alzheimer Awareness Month” in the Town of Fort Frances;
•referred an invitation from the Alzheimer Society to attend its second-annual Chefs’ Charitable Dinner and Auction here Jan. 21 to the Administration and Finance executive committee for its recommendation;
•referred a report from the municipal planner to merge the planning advisory committee and committee of adjustment to the Planning and Development executive committee for its recommendation;
•referred a request for sponsorship of the second-annual Women’s Health Symposium (slated for May 12) to the Administration and Finance executive committee for its recommendation; and
•referred a request from Todd Hamilton for support of a Team Canada Legends game here Jan. 19 to the Administration and Finance executive committee for its recommendation (this event would be a fundraiser for the CT scanner at La Verendrye Hospital).


Council to hear pair of presentations

By Duane Hicks
For its first regular meeting, the newly-elected town council is scheduled to see a pair of presentations from the Fort Frances Public Library board and the Rainy River Valley Safety Coalition (RRVSC) tonight.
Chairwoman Joyce Cunningham will present to council the library board’s strategic plan for the next four years.
“Every few years, we do a strategic plan, which is essentially a road map which tells us where we’ll be going,” explained Cunningham. “We just completed it in the fall. It predicts where we’re going and what we need to do.
“We analyzed what we’ve done in the past little while. We did a S.W.O.T. analysis again—Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats,” she added.
“We asked ourselves ‘Where are we going in the next few years, and what are the areas we need to concentrate on?’”
While they’ll be elaborated on at tonight’s council meeting, Cunningham noted the five areas identified include proceeding with the planning for a new library building, customer service, technology, and training both for staff and library board members.
The last strategic plan done by the library board was submitted to council in 2002.
Meanwhile, RRVSC chair Grace Silander is expected to be on hand to present council with two signs designating Fort Frances as a “Safe Community” by the World Health Organization.
This is a follow-up from the WHO “Safe Communities” conference held here back in 2002.
The council meeting starts at 6:20 p.m. It will be preceded by the committee of the whole, which is expected to be in-camera from 5:30-5:45, after which time it will convene in council chambers.
Other business at tonight’s meeting will include:
•a request from the Alzheimer Society of Kenora/Rainy River Districts to proclaim January as “National Alzheimer Awareness Month” in the Town of Fort Frances;
•an invitation from the Alzheimer Society to attend its second-annual Chefs’ Charitable Dinner and Auction here Jan. 21;
•a report from the municipal planner to merge the planning advisory committee and committee of adjustment;
•a request for sponsorship of the second-annual Women’s Health Symposium (slated for May 12); and
•a request from Todd Hamilton, Team Canada Legends organizer, for support of a Team Canada Legends game here Jan. 19 (this event would be a fundraiser for the CT scanner at La Verendrye Hospital).

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